Linux Sync client support for 18.10

Ilsa Loving shared this idea 1 month ago
Under Consideration

The Linux client as it currently exists is hopelessly inadequate. On Ubuntu (18.10) it won't launch. Furthermore, you have no idea what's wrong unless you modify the filecloudsyncstart.sh file and remove the redirection to /dev/null. Apparently I do not have the necessary libpng12.so.0 file.


For anyone else having the problem and are using Ubuntu, here is the solution:https://www.linuxuprising.com/2018/05/fix-libpng12-0-missing-in-ubuntu-1804.html


In addition, there is no .desktop file, so unless the user knows how to create one on their own, it is not possible to launch the app from the application menu.


The best option would be to provide the linux sync client in the form of a snap, flatpak or appimage package, so that you can distribute the client in a non-distribution specific manner, using whatever libraries you want.

Comments (4)

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1

Thanks for the issue report, we will look into improving this support.

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After talking with support I understand that you are testing against 16.04 and 17.10. I would advise that there is no point testing against non-LTS releases they have only a 6 month support period anyway, and anyone using these releases will likely migrate to the next version as it comes out. Instead, I would focus on the LTS releases including 16.04 and 18.04.


In particular, you will notice that the included libpng library is 1.6 instead of 1.2.

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Thanks for the note, we will move to supporting only 18.04 and LTS releases in the future.

Also, for us to prioritize, could you tell us if you are using Linux company wide? Our support on Linux is less than perfect mainly because of lack of users using Linux.

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We are doing what we can to make Linux a viable alternative for us, which is one of the reasons I chose FileCloud in the first place. The greatest limiting factor has been finding tools that are fully cross platform, so it's a bit of a chicken and egg problem. The more quality cross-platform tools we can find, the more viable Linux itself becomes.